Yam ul Jumma in Da Lou: Corruption, Salaams, Khalil Greene, and Masjid Food

Corruption

This is the end of the month and the Cardinals are not in town so business is slow, and I mean slowwwwwwwwww. Anyway, I wish I had the comfort to blog about something I saw last night; because it illustrates the culture of political corruption here in St. Louis. If you are part of the club here you can flaunt your corruption; but if you are not in the club then you become a target of prosecution and public scrutiny (see Virvus Jones, Eddie Hasan, etc.).

Salaam at the Light

I was at the stoplight at Delmar and Kingshighway next to the Mobil station owned by Iraqi brothers that sells bean pies when a brother honked is horn at me and yelled out “salaamalaikum akhi Umar” I turned and returned the greeting not really knowing who it was until he drove off. It was Missouri State Rep. Talib el-Amin.

What You Get When a Yuppie Becomes a Pro Athlete

Khalil Greene, a yuppie from a Baha’i family, is a player for the St. Louis Cardinals who has went nuts and is injuring himself so now he had to be put on the DL.  This is what you get when a yuppie becomes an athlete and that is why most yuppies are not into sports. They would rather watch American Idol or a spelling bee and if they have to play something they play some sport they choose a kids sport like kick ball or dodgeball (they choose these sports because they are non-contact, co-ed, and they can goof off and not really try to win).

To be a good athlete you have to be a team player and not a spoiled-brat, have to observe deferred gratification, have to lose, have to be told you are doing a bad job, and have to suck it up when times get tough, all thing secular yuppies don’t observe who were babied since they were kids by parents who “spared the rod”.

Masjid Food

I have eaten food at many masjids all over the country. Some, are more famous than others. WD Mohammed masjids tend to have good food no matter what city you are in but it is always the same thing (Fried fish or chicken with a side of greens, spaghetti and cornbread with someone selling bean pies and cheese cakes on the side).  Dar al Hijrah in VA is another one that used to have great food when Fawaz was still the cook. Yesterday I attended jumma at the old Islamic Center ( now Masjid Bilal) and heard an excellent talk by Sheikh Minhaj and got some food there for the first time since Ramadan and I mean to tell you that is some of the best Pakistani food I ever had and I don’t even know what it was. My only request is this; if you are going to sell food hot enough to burn a glacier can you also sell a drink on the side?

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9 thoughts on “Yam ul Jumma in Da Lou: Corruption, Salaams, Khalil Greene, and Masjid Food

  1. Oh, come on, Umar, only a yuppie-bred kid would complain about padas padas food! ;) (Malay for “very spicy.”)

    I’m kidding, of course. I was telling Milady the other day that the difference between her and me is that when I eat spicy food (which I do like), I don’t want the spiciness to overwhelm the taste of the rest of the ingredients. Milady and her family are the exact opposite; they’d rather have an atomic bomb of spiciness go off in their mouths. Anything less for them is a disappointment.

  2. Forget the sody on the side. Its all about the yogurt. You are supposed to use the yogurt to temper the heat.
    If you cant get yogurt then drink milk. It works better than water.
    Those pakistani dishes dont have nothing on some cous cous that I had back in the day that was cooked by a Tunisian sister.
    I had tears rolling down my face!

  3. I can’t really say I’m into Pakistani food. Once I was given some drink made from sour cream I pretty much turn away from it. But I’m Mexican-american so I don’t necessary need to to experience other cultures tastes. Especially when I have the best of foods at home..lol

  4. You right about the WD Masaajid (re: usually having good food). The one I go to down the street from me (DC) has the best spaghetti. I don’t know why they don’t make it more often. Making me hungry just thinking about it.

  5. Peter, good point, That is one kind of toughness; but not the kind of toughens that you need for some other sports. Also, as dedicated as some yuppies and cyclists are, the runners cant beat the East Africans LOL. Now, if you go to my sport, which is boxing, I can tell you 100% for sure that the yuppies I have seen boxing have missed those key elements.

  6. Umar, I am also a boxer and it is the only sports i like watching.
    Before i got interested in Islam I used to read books about the great boxers in history from Jack Johnson to Muhammad Ali. I recommend you to read the biography of Muhammad Ali, it’s a great book and is one of the best boxing book I’ve ever read. All the boxing experts rank him as the greatest boxer of all time.

  7. Well the some of those Kenyans were just born to run. And while there are yuppie sports that involve an element of danger (such as mountaineering, rock climbing, skiing and scuba diving) you are right that sports which involve testing ones strength against another are generally avoided by yuppies. The main exceptions seeming to be fencing and rugby although they’re relatively minor. Another thing is that I would draw a distinction between “yuppies” who while liberal and secular are pretty achievement focused and materialistic and the sort of people described on the website “stuff white people like” who are less into advancing in the corporate world and more interested in listening to music, going to grad school and only using their bikes to get around. Even though there’s a lot of overlap.

    http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/2008/06/02/102-childrens-games-as-adults/

  8. @Umar: I got the chance to comment on your post.
    You were talking about some Pakistani food, but dont know the name of the dish. I am 100% sure that you ate Biryani.
    Biryani is actually spicy rice.
    Every American like it. Because it considered one of the king dish in Pakistan.

    Let me know, if you ate that.

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