Chance to Get Some Good Deeds and Cover Your Sins

Let us remember that we are all Muslims and the ultimate goal for all of us it to go to Paradise. In order to do this we will need good deeds on Judgment Day or Allah has promised that we will be consumed by fire.

One of the best things we can do as Muslims is to donate our wealth to those Muslims in need. There has been a lot of rhetoric back and forth over the last few days and if any of us has sinned lets try and make up for those sins by doing some good deeds. I am going to list three opportunities insha’Allah.

  1. There is a Muslim family with young children on the verge of home eviction during this cold winter and they are in the desperate need of at least $1,500. If you can help this Muslim family please contact me insha’Allah.
  2. There is a masjid in Washington, DC with no heat. This causes a hardship on the believers. If anyone can donate their money or work to get these brothers and sisters some heat please email you and I will put you in contact with the right people.
  3. There is a masjid in Newark, NJ that has not paid the rent and is facing eviction. I would like to see the Muslims at this masjid reconcile with another masjid near by; but if this cannot happen please email me and I will put you in contact with those who can accept donations.
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8 thoughts on “Chance to Get Some Good Deeds and Cover Your Sins

  1. Without knocking the thought-provoking debate, this gesture is mature and in line with the Sunnah.

    Summing up the reaction HY et.al., it appears that a class divide on these matters is real.

    Mostly, HY is speaking as if he belongs to a ‘Height- Ashbury’ madhab, but the brother, in ‘actual fact’, is quite deep and politically and emotionally ‘liberal’.

    But it is hard to see how that ‘soft talk’ can appeal to a brother growing up in the Bronx or Brooklyn. What is really interesting is the followers of these men seem and sound as if they are mainly Indo-Pakistani immigrants.

    It is that connection which would strike the sociologist or the student of the British Raj.

  2. Umar,

    Some of your posts are more than a bit devilish!

    Controversy for its own sake is sad and childish.

    Polar bears? Hippies? Lattes? What the hell man.

  3. As I am pretty sure which Masajid you are reffering, I sincerely pray Allah relieves their suffering, and that they remember Allah’s mercy towards them when next they deal with others.

    The call be made using … “wisdom and good” and disputes conducted in the “better way” … When you show no mercy to others no mercy will be shown to you. nevertheless, Allah is oft forgiving and most merciful.

    As I’m attached to a Masjid that is dealing with financial hardship I take no pleasure in the pain of other Muslims. May Allah make it easy for those upon La ilaha ill Allah, Muhammad-ur-Rasul Allah and who openly call people to tawheed.

  4. What is really interesting is the followers of these men seem and sound as if they are mainly Indo-Pakistani immigrants. It is that connection which would strike the sociologist or the student of the British Raj.

    Am I the only one who doesn’t see this connection that others keep trying to draw? I’ve been to a few Zaytuna events, and I haven’t observed a higher percentage of South Asians than you would see in your average suburban masjid. Yes, Zaytuna and its affiliated scholars have a lot of South Asian (and Arab) followers, but I think that just reflects the fact that South Asians are the predominant ethnic group in the socioeconomic bracket that Zaytuna caters to. It has nothing to do with the British Raj or any pecularities of South Asian culture or the mindset of South Asians; it’s purely reflective of the demographics of the Muslim community. It’s socieoeconomics, not ethnicity. HY’s message doesn’t resonate with working-class South Asian Muslims, who gravitate more toward Deobandi-influenced scholars and institutions.

    And personally, many of the South Asians I grew up with don’t particularly care for the whole Zaytuna scene. I grew up in a Midwestern suburb, yet most of my religiously-inclined family and friends either lean Salafi or self-identify as such. That’s admittedly anecdotal evidence, but I don’t think we’re anomalous.

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