My Thought, Culture Matters

Last week one night it was late and I was dropped off at the Broadway Junction Subway Station in Brooklyn and when I arrived there was a big police scene and TV news crews. The guy who dropped me off lives in the area and told me that a guy had stabbed a couple of cops a few hours earlier and that he had been killed ( which I later found at that two cops were stabbed but I think the guy is alive who did it). He was happy and said ” man people are tired of this shit…police killing people like Sean Bell who havent did anything…people aint gonna take this shit anymore.” Anyway, you get the point.

It turns out that the stabber probaby has never heard of Sean Bell and is an undocumented Central American immigrant who has already been deported once for assaulting cops, but that sentiment is out there, and at that time the city was embracing for the word on whether the police officers involved in the shooting death of Bell ( an unarmed black man) would be charged by the grand jury. There were threats that if there was no indictment that there would be a riot and the Rev. Al Sharpton had been on TV daily representing the family along with the fiance of Bell ( who was killed on his wedding day leaving a Jamaica Queens strip club).

The announcement didnt come until several days later and the officers were indicted , today in fact, although the news was leaked over the weekend and one of the officers went out and had a $4,000 meal on Saturday night I guess to celebrate his indictment ( this particular officer, Michael Oliver, fired 31 shots).

Would the city have rioted if there would have bene no indictment? I dont think so. The only way to get the young generation to riot is to cut off BET or MTV and ban cell phones or ipods and maybe white kids would riot if you would cancel American Idol.  There would have been an angry and noisy protests by maybe a few thousand people but that would have been about it. There is no organization to spark a riot, much less orchestrate one, and Sharpton cant even get his own people elected to City Council seats in Brooklyn.

There may not have been a riot, but there could have been some violence against cops, and they are vulnerable, as we saw last week when a guy from St. Louis killed two auxillary cops and a pizzeria worker before being gunned down by cops in The Village. But would it have solved anything?

As I said when this case first came out it seems like when the police make a mistake and kill someone there is always a black male at the other end of the bullet. So there is a problem with the attitude of police towards African-American males and it needs to be addressed and the police in many neighborhoods are more like an occupying force than one that is serving the community. There is also the fact that a lot of cops think they are above the law and and should not have to be accountable for their mistakes; they knew the job was tough when they took it.  The other side of the coin is that in most major cities the majority of the violent predators are black males and that is something the civil rights community doesnt want to recognize. When I lived in the Brownsville Projects almost all of the men were either in jail, had just got out, or were on their way, and if Im in a shootout with them Im gonna shoot to kill and let the  Allah and the judge decide who was right later.

We do not know a lot about Bell and his friends, but we will find out, we do know his death was a tragedy and unnecassary; although a guy going to a strip club on his wedding day and getting ready to drink and drive was no angel.

Thats what i thought about while in the train and then…..

I got to the bus stop in Williamsburgh Brooklyn ( a mixed area of Puerto Ricans, Orthodox Jews and globos) and there was like a hundred people at the bus stop and when the bus pulled up they stampeded to get on like a heard of wild Buffaloes. People were pushing and shoving and old ladies were getting bumped and all of that. Culture matters.

When I catch the bus coming from the other direction, where it is mostly Irish, Polish and even a lot of Asians and Desis they form a perfect line and get on the bus in an orderly manner.
On that note, after I watchd the Erin Go Brawl Boxing card on Friday Night featring Irish boxers John Duddy (Derry) and Andy Lee (Limerick) I caught the St. Paddys Day Parade on TV on Saturday. 300,000 marchers and 2 million spectators and no deaths. Drunkeness, bad behaviour and stupidity yes, but no stampedes or deaths even after a large snow storm the night before. 

Advertisements

41 thoughts on “My Thought, Culture Matters

  1. For anyone that has worked in customer service, it can be an insightful experience in human sociality. For example, a teller or cashier has a good perspective on culture. On a daily basis, they are engaging with a vast array of individuals from diverse economic and social backgrounds. Patterns emerge and certain “people” become memorable. From my experience, I’ve noticed that there has always been at least one co-worker that would intentionally avoid serving Black customers. In this predicament, it has always been an issue of culture and civility, not race. I’ve always said, colour doesn’t matter but people make it an issue. But, in all political incorrectness, I’ll admit that my most intolerable and obnoxious customers were almost all Black. In those circumstances, it was a matter of culture. Or should I say, a lack of it? It is even present in some Blacks that don’t subscribe to that abhorrent American ghetto mentality in the later Hip-hop generations. I’ve never observed this behaviour in an African immigrant.

  2. Abdul-Quddus,
    People use the culture argument to say the same things the Klansmen been saying for all these years. Your co-workers are racists. You don’t have to burn crosses on people’s lawns to accept racist views and perpetuate them. In fact, it seems as if you internalized them. But you can separate yourself from anti-Black stereotypes being that you’re not in America and you are Caribbean-
    Canadian. But your analysis on race relations and cultural characteristics is really off based.

    I’ve worked in customer service for years, some on the phone and some in person. Obnoxious people come in all shapes and varieties and in every culture. Different cultures have different ways of expressing things. We may be more forgiving of someone with an accent who is cursing at us using words we don’t understand. I have had Indian customers, Latino customers, Asian customers, white customers, African, Caribbean, and Black customers who have driven me and my co-workers equally crazy. You act as if all Africans have gone to finishing school and as if Black people have some genetic predetermination to being obnoxious. All I can say is, whatever man… your understanding of Black American culture is so limited.

  3. Absolutely, in all demographics, there are obnoxious people. Lets not insinuate. I said that a significant segment — but not all — of the Black community is inflicted with a particular behavioural problem. Sheneneh comes to mind. There is a lack of culture or proper culture that, if present, would produce civility in society. I carefully made an observation about the Africans I’ve met personally, but not a generalization or stereotype encompassing all Africans. However, when I said “at least one co-worker” avoided Black customers, you responded with “Your co-workers are racists.”

  4. Yes, the black culture has issues, and so does everyone else. Unfortunately, if you stay in the hood you’ll see the worst of the worst. This I learned when I moved from Brightwaters, NY to the DC metro area. Those who watch too much TV will think about Sheneneh when they think of black women.

    As a black – PROUD TO BLACK; HAPPY TO BE NAPPY – woman, I will NEVER apologize for those who fight whatever disgusting stereotype, as I will NEVER apologize for the sick Muslims who were behind 9/11 and continue to terrorize the world because THEY DON’T KNOW ISLAM or sense enough to read the Quran for themselves. Having said that, it does become tired when you hear others talk about black issues YET don’t pose a solution OR pretend their groups are free from ISSUES. Take a trip to rural America and see white America’s shame, the ones they DO NOT expose to the world. THe majority of white’s in America, who by the way acccording the BLS are on public assistance.

    ALL cultures have issues. I dont’ think the Civil Rights Leaders are denying the problems of the inner cities. They do not know how to address them, because the majority of them are like me and were fortunate enough to be raise elsewhere. So two things occurs – we can’t relate, so may not know how to address these things. On one message board I was told it’s a rite of passage for young (as in under 18) black girls to lose their virginity to older men (over 23). During my teen years sex wasn’t on my mind, besides my father, brothers, uncles, grandfathers, and cousins would have kicked my behind, but were wise enough to educate us about sex and warn us about fornicating. It was understood that I had to wait until marriage, which I did. We also had things to do after school, and our mother was home, so we didn’t have the freedom of being home unattended.

    Yes, today’s children have too many luxuries, too much free time, and VERY LITTLE adult supervision.

    The other factor, we feel there is nothing we can do (if you don’t care about yourself, why should I?). I have made it my mission in life to help under privileged youth, particulary black American youth. It gets frustrating at times because many, NOT ALL, do not want to work with me. I personally sent out 250 letters for free tutoring and after care for elementary schools – only 10 responses. My point is when you deal with those who aren’t interested, for whatever reason, in progressing it becomes easier to ignore them (which is the worse thing one can do).

    Now onto a few things (not all) which comes to mind when I think of other races/ethnicities: whites – PEDOPHILE CENTRAL, incest (and we aren’t talking about kissing cousins), bestiality. (I Used to be married to an Italian, and grew up on what used to be predominately white Long Island – Those girls were sluts, many had abortions (hmmm… I guess this is the difference between a poor black girl and wealthy white girl – one can afford to murder, I mean get an abortion – Allahu Alim). Oh yeah, the white on white violence exists – Ireland, Mafia;

    Desis – misogyny, wife beatings, so called honor killings, bestiality, IGNORANCE of showing the so called bloody beds sheets to family and friends (YES I was a virgin when I married, thank GOD he was an AMERICAN and we were not Muslim at the time, otherwise I may have been humilated and a precious night disgraced by a horrific tradition which has NO basis in Islam), Don’t forget the wonderful caste system;

    Arabs – MISOGNY, the men are WHORES (Do you know how many letters I receive each day about Arab men making babies and abandoning them? and the only good arab is my son/daughter…)bestiality, homosexuality (nah, they won’t talk about it, but the Christian Arabs (very nice folks) will, among other things (BTW my husband’s an Arab as well as my brother’s wife of 15 years so I do have A LOT of insight into their cultures as well…My non Muslim brother has lived in Kuwait and SAudi for several year. I won’t even address the self hatred these groups have as well. Yep, the Arab on Arab violence is there – Israeli – Palestine; and one only has to look at what’s happening in the Middle East, more ARab on Arab violence. We all know the tricks to dating and fornicationg overseas…

    Africans – FGM and the rest I’ll keep to myself ;)

    With all of our issues, I’m proud to say bestiality is NOT a black issue – LOL we missed that one and all the other ills plaguing our community PALES in comparison to that.

    Unfortunately, I like the CHristian Arabs (truthfully, non Muslims of other ethnicities) better than the Muslims. Also, I work at one masjid and will SADLY say that the majority of sisters who catch diseases, and have cheating husbands, and bruises on their bodies (which I find ironic for Muslim men – just marry her JACK*SSS) are married to SE Asians and Arab men.

  5. Since we all claim to be Muslims, let do what we are supposed to, and help the disenfranchise and save those who are on a maladaptive trajectory. Once these folks, regardless of their race/gender/ethnicity realize their worth, all this madness will stop, but it will not occur overnight. We are all affected by societal ills, some more than others. Don’t ever believe it will not affect you. Suburbia, at least Long Island, is not the same. If you are part of the solution, you are PART OF THE PROBLEM.

    btw – to see how the rest of BEAUTIFUL Black America lives, I invite you to travel to my home – PG County, MD (not the areas on DC borders which are troubled by gentrification and DC criminals who know PG Police can not cross the border) and see the immaculate homes OWNED by blacks in many of our upscale neighborhoods. Oh yeah you will see black husbands with their BEAUTIFUL black wives and well mannered black children.

    Do not equate DEADBEAT (study the history of this word for the true meaning) parents with black culture, as ghetto and black are not the same.

    Or travel south to Lady Smith, VA – more blacks living the American dream – husband/wife/children. Or you can come up to Northern VA and visit my relatives in their PAID IN FULL multimillion dollar homes – more black men married to beautiful black women, raising beautiful black children.

    These are the folks I come from, this is my culture. What I have ingrained in me as black culture, and what I’m passing onto my children – success; pride in who they are (remember the ancestors – look back to black america BEFORE the Civil Rights Era truth be told black america was better off back then. My grandparents we very successful and so were their parents.

    Anyway, I’ll leave you with some thoughts from a typical black man. Typical in the sense that he is the kind of black man I am accustomed to interacting with each day. The kind that raised me.

    Why should it be such a pleasant surprise to see a Black person who is spiritual, clean, educated, who can master English, and does not want to smoke blunts, drink forties, curse like drunken sailors, or go around and make babies with as many females of our species as we can?

    Why should it be expected that because I drive what I drive, that I must be a drug dealer?

    Why must it be that I only like gangsta rap? Why must it be that where I live must be dirty with no grass or trees; only concrete and basketball courts; only loud rap music with its hateful and sexually oriented lyrics be heard?

    Why must it be that I must only speak in Ebonics to the point that I must have a sub-title screen running across my chest so that people can understand what the hell I’m saying? (Who remembers the movie, “Airplane” and the two Black men on the plane?)

    Why must prom night in Black America be like watching the Cartoon Network?

    When did it become completely OK to create a baby out of wedlock?

    When did it become completely OK to not have to have men as fathers?

    When did the shame of being gainfully unemployed with no desire to BE employed disappear?

    Why must it be that I cannot appreciate a fine-dining experience and know enough social etiquette to sit my lady first; sample the wine and know if it’s good or not; can know what each piece of silverware is in front of me? Why not?!

    Why CAN’T those who are NOT ghetto escape this madness without being branded a traitor or sellout?

  6. Your comment was really great bintWill. But for some reason out of the entire thing the little part you had about cheating muslim men really cracked me up. It is kind of funny in a sad sort of way when you think about. Where is the logic in that?

    Your post was great too Umar. I especially liked this part “Muslims do not get this and would be poor and oppressed even if America and Israel ceased to exist because of culture so if you want to change the ummah be a culture warrior and not a jihadist.”
    Couldn’t agree more. I’m probably way too pessimistic but I don’t really hold out much hope for any change in culture to occur on the part of anyone really. Its much easier to point out the faults than actually come up with any meaningful and longlasting solutions, which has become quite evident over the years

  7. As salaam alaikum.

    My Irish mother always told me that the Irish put the ‘cult in culture’. Having drank my share of Guinness, watched a lifetime of ND football games and tortured myself with the collected works of Ireland’s motley crew of literary giants I can say:

    أشهد أن لا إله إلاَّ الله و أشهد أن محمد رسول الله

    and really only miss the Guinness.

    Wa salaama,

    nuh ibn

  8. I think it is more about social-economic status more than anything else.

    I have been to the Middle East and their lower class/poor society acts in ways that are very similar to the way that other poor and lower class people act all around the world, including the USA.

    If you meet people from the Middle East who are well educated, well traveled and the like you’ll see they almost completly match their counterparts in the West.

    Look at the immigrant Muslim populations in the USA versus those in places like France. Here in the USA the immigrant Muslim makes more money than the average American, is better educated and more traveled than the average American.

    So here in the USA Muslims are more likely to come from backgrounds where they have a sense of culture, they have some class, and they dont act in these ways.

    Look at Muslim immigrants in places like France where they are usually poor, uneducated, untraveled and dont have much to look forward to. I have been to places like this in France and I’ll tell you they reminded me exactly of the slums and ghettos here in the USA in places like Chicago, New York, and a host of other places.

    I dont think, to a large extent, that this has much to do with race. It is more about educated and social-economic status.

    A well educated person from the USA will function just fine in the same environment in Europe, or even to a certain extent, in the Middle East. It goes the other way as well. Take a poor person from the inner-city in New York and they will readily identify with a person in a ghetto in Paris.

  9. Abu Sinan, you’re 100 percent correct – it is all about SES, which brings in another factor – Old money vs. New money.

    If we were to closely examine the criminal justice system, we’ll find the punishments are much harsher for the less fortunate who often rely on the legal guy/gal who barely passed the bar.

    Anon – I’ll never understand the cheating muslim man trend. Unfortunately it’s very common in the DC metro area. The majority of my friends are not Muslims, I know most of their boyfriends who happen to be Muslim men, men that won’t even return my salaams when they see me at the masjid. They make me want to beat them with a wrought iron baseball bat.

    Change does start at home, first ourselves, then families and respective communities.

    Darn – either way I’m at the bottom of the totem pole – female, black, and Muslim. Unless of course I do what I do best and flip it ;) LOL

  10. LOL bintWill, I feel the same way. There are A LOT of people who need the wrought iron treatment.

    But it isnt always about money. My wife was good friends with another Saudi lady she knew. She was married to a man, from the same tribe, who is now the Editor in Chief of one of the best known Arabic papers in the world.

    The tribe they come from in Saudi is well known and has LOTS of money. Didnt stop him from being a very well known player at the local Uni when they lived here. I am not sure how much play he got because the guy was not gifted in the looks department, but money often makes up for this with some women.

    What is sad is the guy had married his wife, first cousin, at a very early age and she is very attractive. Yet even with this good looking devoted wife at home he was still out looking around.

    As to the criminal justice system, money means everything. If OJ Simpson were a poor white or black man he would have gotten the death penalty and had already been executed by now. Seeing that he had money, that trumped EVERYTHING, including race.

  11. Culture Does Matter a lot,, and I think I have discovered this on my own without reading literature on culture,, am all down with cultural relativism,, but I get the feel that it becomes the new scapegoat,,

    The Manners which Islam fosters ought to promote some sort of cultural cohesion among Muslimeen, and with a sign of mature social behavior, of course it is ideal to just make it in first generation of practicing Muslims,, but it would be a failure if it is not passed to our grandchildren the least..

    I guess if the manners Islam promotes and the attitude towards the any other, becomes more entrenched in Muslimeen. Then we should least have less problems, of course this is all theoretical the practical is a different story.

    Islam is the easiest way to change the culture of Muslimeen, yet even the Sahaba would be deemed to have ‘cultural issues’ by todays standards I think some cultural inequality (in terms of one culture viewing the other) among different races cant be escaped and we just have to deal with it,,

    I guess this whole cultural dilemma thing is part of the new globalised age, perhaps new age anthropologists can come up with something fruity we can use!

  12. Hmmm, once I am done grading papers I will have to write my own cultural critique of European and White American culture. But for now, here are my random thoughts:

    I have been living in white suburbia for three years and I personally have had enough. I find Umar’s blog problematic because it implies that Western (White) culture is dominant because it is superior. Culture matters, especially when you have a culture that dehumanizes everyone else so that it is easy to exploit them. For many whites, I become that “black woman” that leaves on their street, in their class, in their department. My grievances aren’t real because those stereotypes render me voiceless. But yet, white people get to have their individuality. Their gripes are real, their observations are powerful (especially when they are taking on the anthropologist lense and observing cultures not their own). In their mind, rugged individualism applies only to whites but minorities are an aggregate of some statistics. Therefore, I did not get into graduate school because I am smart. It becomes affirmative action and somehow I deprived some poor white kid who is naturally smarter an opportunity to rise of the Socio-economic ladder. But a poor white person rises in ranks, they assume that his will power made it happen. They are an individual, a product of a powerful culture that instills hard work and integrity. Me, I get in because of some welfare culture. But these are myths that many in white America tell itself.

    They also assume that everyone wants to be like them. Guess what America? Not everyone does. I like my culture. I love having brown skin. I look at my mom in her fifties and there are women of other races in their thirties who look older than her. No one can guess my age. I like the skin that I’m in and I’m proud of the struggle that Black Americans have experienced. I love Soul Food and the culture that my mother and grandmothers taught me. They taught me to value education, kindness, to value family and friendships. They taught me that family is not just blood (or race since our family incorporates has taken any white people also). Like the sister said, I’m happy to be be nappy and wouldn’t have it any other way. My culture is inclusive, so much so that people who are not from it often think they can commidify it. They think they can watch BET or hang out in the hood and understand it. But they miss the subtleties of culture (the language, literature, myths, the symbols of meaning are shared among the group).

    There are things I notice about other ethnicties regarding cleanliness, hygeine, social graces, hospitality, openness, and honesty. I’ve been exposed to a number of groups to have a general impression of how certain groups operate. This goes to white Americans too. And when I reflect on this, I am really happy that my mother raised me the way she did. There are broad generalizations that do not apply to everyone within that group. But I’ve seen the armpit of America. And guess what? It is very White. I’ve travelled to Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, and Vermont. I’ve seen the most ignorant broke down, poor white folks staring at me as if I was a piece of trash. I have seen Meth heads, high school drop outs, trailer park trash, teen-age mothers, crazy cat ladies, strippers, hill billies, trashy white women who only date black men, goths, punks, poor kids with lice-all-over-their-heads, skin-heads, and crack heads. Hmm, but middle class white folks don’t feel as if they have to combat the stereotypes that poor whites seem to conjure. Ask Allen Johnston about why that is.

    I’ve also seen the ex-hippy, now yuppies who exist in San Francisco with no culture, arrogant, poor social skills, abominable levels of hospitality, and questionable levels of personal cleanliness. Some of the loudest, meanest women I know are white and Asian (I know loud mean Black women too).
    So, if we are going to critique culture, if we are going to look at the lowest rungs of a particular group. Then the same standards applies to whites too.

  13. Umar – Good points but I can’t imagine that the world wouldn’t be better off w/o Israel, and the Muslim world in particular.

    BintWill – I’m operating under the assumption that you’re Muslim. So, what are you doing drinking wine? Your quote, “Why must it be that I cannot…sample the wine and know if it’s good or not…?!”

  14. Margari,

    Nice post. All groups/races/religions have people like this. No one is exempt. Everyone should be proud of who they are whilst realising there is room for improvement.

    Trust me, as a white guy living in Virginia, I have seen the types of white people you are talking about, but it doesnt make me ashamed to be white. The same goes for any other group. There is not one group out there that doesnt have their issues.

    Time and time out people defy the stereotypes that others want to force on them. Poor white trash living in rural Virginia do not represent me or who I am any more than gang banging thugs represent the average African American.

    I am a tall white guy with blond hair and blue eyes, I have tattoos, and look like I could be a biker with my short hair and goatee. Alhamdulillah, I am a Muslim who is also educated, married to an Arab, and has a great family. Masha’Allah.

    I always get stereotyped by other whites who think because of the way I look that I hate anyone who isnt white and that it is okay to talk to me about “ragheads” and “camel jockies”. I get stereotyped by people who are not white who think that I must be racist and hate people of colour. “Surprise, surprise, meet my half Arab children.”

    Muslims stereotype me, I must have converted for my wife. I probably cannot even pray, “surprise, surprise, I speak Arabic with a Saudi accent.”

    I am not saying I experience anything like a person of colour does in the USA. No matter my background, how many tattoos I have, and the like, I still benefit from the white power structure.

    However, it is clear that all stereotypes must be dropped in able to see clearly. It is equally clear, after traveling as much as I have and seeing as many cultures as I have, that every culture has something to offer.

    To me that is the great part of being American, in that we can take and give culture freely. We are not bound to a history that demands we conform. Current American history shows us that Americans are known for taking other people’s cultures, but if done benignly, that is a good thing.

    One can incooperate aspects of other cultures in their own and still remain who they are. I dont need to play “Ali G” to see that other cultures have things I can benefit from.

    Anyway, I think all cultures fail when a close light is held up to them. Heck, even a people considered high “cultured” like the Germans, who turned out Beethoven, Bach and Mozart, also turned out Hitler and the death camps.

  15. Nuh Ibn,

    LOL

    I am placing my bets on there being non-intoxicating Guiness in Jennah. Maybe some non-intoxicating reefer too.

    Okay, I am being really bad, but sometimes at the end of a hard day with 3 little kids….arrgghhh.

    Audhu-billah.

  16. Just a quibble, Bell was shot the day or days before his wedding, which is why his fiance gets so much airtime. The strip club thing is pretty abhorrent though, not the last thing I wanna do before I die.

  17. Brother Umar,

    From your perspective what are some key differences between “Black American” and “White American” culture?

    Sister Margari Aziza Hill said,
    “There are things I notice about other ethnicities regarding cleanliness, hygiene, social graces, hospitality, openness, and honesty…This goes to white Americans too.”

    As a person of color, growing up it was common to hear things like: “white people smell like wet dogs,” that you shouldn’t eat at buffets with white people because they pick at the food with unwashed fingers (they don’t wash their hands after using the bathroom), they don’t use washcloths, they (especially their children) are very rude, they are generally racist, superficial, and competitive etc.

    Although i know these things aren’t true for every white person, it was “common knowledge” among the Black people that i knew regardless of class. and this “common knowledge” created a sense of moral superiority.

    I do think that some major cultural changes need to be made for all groups of people. i also understand that Black folks can act “ig’nat” sometimes. but i never internalized that as being a part of my culture. for example if i was even a little disrespectful to my mom (that is raised my voice a tiny tiny bit) she would ask me “do you think you have a white mom?) the understanding was that white children could be extremely rude to their mothers (to the extent of using profanity) and not be punished. even though this is a stereotype, its still remains funny to Black people, hence Black comedians tell the joke about the little white kid in the grocery store hitting his mum and calling her the b-word, and for the millionth time its always funny to a lot of Black people (im not saying it funny to me).

    stereotypes suck across the board. i hate ’em. and even sought at the age of 7 to defy them completely (really young!), but despite your exposure to “the other(s)” there may be some other dialog going on in communities of color that you don’t know about. . . or maybe not

    but i really like to know what happens when people stop being pc and start getting real. id rather know what folks really think ya know?

  18. Hum, I thought I was raised racist! My father was an out and out racist but never said some of the stuff that Talibah says their mother said to them.

    I guess it is amazing that racism can infect all groups of people.

    The idea that only whites can be racist is clearly wrong. I guess it is the extent of the harm that the racism can do that is at question.

    People of colour can clearly be racist, but the effects of their racism are not as great as that of white society.

    Again, I think honestly it is more about how much money and what class you were than about race.

    The idea about the white mother being abused by her children might hold up for upper class white families, but trust me, poor/working class mothers would whack their children just as quick as any black mother from the same background.

    On the other hand, I have seen spoiled rotten children from black families where the household income was in the high 6 digits.

    It is more about social-economic background. I think poor whites and blacks have more in common than they do with people of their own race who make much more money. What is sad is these people do not realise it and are all too ready to fight for the scrapes from the rich man’s table.

  19. Abu Sinan – No rich women (of any ethnicity) are abused by their children, they have a nanny 24/7 to raise the children (and take the abuse) for them!

    Seriously, I agree that socio economic status plays a very large part in people’s behaviour

  20. “Again, I think honestly it is more about how much money and what class you were than about race.”
    Hmmmm, I don’t think so homie.
    Class? What about class mobility? What about the struggle to make a better life for your family? I know about the struggle for the upwardly mobile blacks. The experience is way different. And if we are going to have class solidarity, you can’t just ignore how race intersects with class and how there institutional racism operates, as well as the networks that many other ethnicities have access to that Blacks don’t. This is why there is a glass ceiling for Blacks in many companies, complete social isolation and discrimination for Blacks in higher education. Even for upper class Black people, they experience racism and exclusion. High class Black people are still assumed to be criminals (how many times does my brother get pulled over for driving while Black?), can’t get into cabs (whether owned by Muslims or not), non-Black people fear Black men when walking down the street alone (I’ve heard even liberal Black men dating white woman say that), middle class Black women can’ find suitable partners because there is gendered racism practiced by upwardly mobile Black men and their non-Black counterparts.

    For understanding how white privilege operates on various class levels, I suggest you read Allen Johnston (Power, Privilege and Difference), Tim Wise (pretty much anything by Tim Wise) and Dalton Conly (Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth, and Social Policy in America and Honky).

  21. Abdul Quddus,
    “However, when I said “at least one co-worker” avoided Black customers, you responded with “Your co-workers are racists.”
    Mistake on my part, your co-worker is a racist.

    That really pisses me off, because I tend to be very gracious, even though I know lots of people assume I’m going to be a head rolling, loud, abusive black woman. I’ve been to a number of restaurants and received poor service and given big tips because I know the waiters would assume I didn’t tip them well because I was Black. I grew up with gendered racism, and it was stifling.

    Abu Sinan,
    There are different forms of racism.

    If you read Talibah’s statements she said:
    “Although i know these things aren’t true for every white person, it was “common knowledge” among the Black people that i knew regardless of class. and this “common knowledge” created a sense of moral superiority.”
    She also qualified her statements.
    I think the point is that many White people assume the world kisses the ground they walk on but other ethnic groups, including blacks who have been subject to White supremacy, hold negative views of white people. I didn’t feel that it was worthwhile repeating some of the stereotypes I grew up with. They are hurtful. But then again I’ve heard the barrage of anti-Black statements since I was a vulnerable little girl, but many adult Whites are barely encountering the abusive statements. Well, unless you had close proximity to Black communities.

    “I think poor whites and blacks have more in common than they do with people of their own race who make much more money. ”
    Poor whites and blacks have a lot more in common. But many poor whites have bought into racist ideologies, or at least myths that subscribe to some form of White supremacy. This gap has been created on purpose to prevent any class consciousness and class solidarity. Instead, we are at each other’s throats.

    “The idea about the white mother being abused by her children might hold up for upper class white families, but trust me, poor/working class mothers would whack their children just as quick as any black mother from the same background.”
    Not all white families allow their children to be abusive. But there are cultural difference in the ways Black families raise their children. Discipline and respect is a huge part of Black culture. Part of it arises from slavery and being housekeepers in white families. Black children could not talk back or act out while the mother or grandmother was at work. Sometimes it was life or death, in other cases it was just a livelihood thing. (These cultural may be changing due to many young teenage mothers who do not know how to discipline their children)
    I was a nanny for a mixed Asian and White (well sort of the father was part Black Egyptian and adopted by a white couple) and I was shocked to see how the children would talk back or negotiate with their parents. They didn’t take no for an answer. Sometimes they’d say things like, “I hate you!” I look at Eminem, and he’s all pissed at his mother. That is crazy. That woman gave birth to him, I have zero respect for him because of that. What Black rapper makes a whole album dissing his mother? Why does that appeal to Middle Class white kids? We should be throwing eggs at him for making those songs. **Stepping down from soapbox**

  22. Ms. Hill writes…

    “For many whites, I become that “black woman” that leaves on their street, in their class, in their department. My grievances aren’t real because those stereotypes render me voiceless. But yet, white people get to have their individuality.”

    And… you know this… how??? Do you speak with and socially interact with these “white people?” When they pass you on the street do they shout out to you, “Hey black woman! Wass up!?!?”

    Of course I’m being facetious… but you “get” the question, right? With respect, it sounds like you’re making assumptions here and I’m curious whether there’s any evidential basis to these assumptions.

    You say you’ve “had enough” of “white suburbia.” So where do you plan on moving? What are you looking for and how do you plan on finding it? Is it “suburbia” in general you have a problem with or simply “white suburbia?” If the latter… I suppose you’ll have to move to “brown suburbia” or “black suburbia.” Frankly, though… I believe self-segregation is the wrong direction to move in… but it’s a free country.

    BILL

  23. abdussabour – had you read the post in it’s entirety, you would have realized I never said I drank wine (never drank it prior to converting to Islam alhumdulillah). I wrote, “Anyway, I’ll leave you with some thoughts from a typical black man. Typical in the sense that he is the kind of black man I am accustomed to interacting with each day. The kind that raised me.”

  24. Margari,

    I understand a lot of what you say, however I see some difference between what you say and what I see.

    You write:

    “But there are cultural difference in the ways Black families raise their children. Discipline and respect is a huge part of Black culture. Part of it arises from slavery and being housekeepers in white families. Black children could not talk back or act out while the mother or grandmother was at work. Sometimes it was life or death, in other cases it was just a livelihood thing.”

    I would have to respectfully ask, “discipline and respect” to what? Part of the problem I see in sections of the African community is a complete lack of discipline and respect for almost anything.

    If the respect is towards the female in the family situation, why is the issue of child rearing and fathering such an issue?

    You talk about Eminem disrespecting his mother, but I fail to see the difference between that and African-American who base their entire careers on talking about “bitches and hos” and shooting theie neighbors and stealing their dope and their money.

    What respect does this show, and to whom? It is a bit odd you can use one white guy to try and make a point about whites, yet I could name you two dozen rappers who have albums full of disrespect and calls for outright violence against women, the whole rap industry is almost built on it.

    If discipline was so well instilled, why the drop out rates and the major issues with academics?

    There seems, for me at least, to be a real disconnect between what you have said and what I see. Not just in sections of the African American community, but even in the Muslim African American community where it seems that Islam is often used to further the lack of “discipline and respect” that you talked about.

    I know this goes for sections of the white community as well, but I would never have made such a broad generalisation about the way that white’s are raised.

  25. As a white guy I guess I feel, at times, both very proud of my heritage and at other times very sad over it.

    Yes, we conquered and ruled Africa and other areas of the world with terrible consequences. Yet we also created most of the modern medical advances, we put the first people into space. As a people we created many genius like Newton, Einstein, Goethe, Shakespeare, Edison and the like.

    There seems to be a dichotomy with Europeans. Germany can put out people like Einstein, Bach, Beethoven and Mozart, yet create a Hitler as well. England can bring out people like Newton, Darwin, Wren and the like, yet create people like Cromwell.

    How many hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved by a small thing like the polio vaccine? Yet how many people killed in colonial exploits from Africa to India?

    How much of the advances that Europeans have made was on the backs of others can be debated, but it is clear that we have done a lot for humanity, but we have done a lot TO humanity as well.

  26. Abu Sinan,

    You should be “proud” of your heritage; no group is without a dark cloud or the small misfits which fits every known stereotype. You have nothing to feel sad over, unless of course you have either remained silent as well pretended everything is kosher OR contributed to whatever…

    I am certainly proud of all the contributions blacks have contributed to America – First open heart surgery, laser printer, traffic light, and the list goes on and on…Blacks have endured a lot, survived slavery where families were literally ripped apart.

    Muslims have contributed a lot to society as well; unfortunately we have a dark cloud as well. As long as we learn to differentiate between the bad apple and entire group we will be fine. There are MANY blacks who make me want to beat them and the rest I’ll keep to myself because of their level of ignorance, but the vast majority of blacks aren’t this way. Same applies to Muslims, as does Arabs, Asians, Whites, Europeans, Africans, American Indians, and Hispanics….

    Yes, the media loves to play up the ignorant blacks. Remember Katrina the black guy was looting and the white guy FOUND food?! Guess what, my beloved Muslims – the media does the same with us (Muslims). So, I ask, why is it a fact when we see the black thug on television and fiction when we see the Muslim thug? Scum is scum, regardless of skin color, ethnicity, religion, dress….

    As I’ve said a zillion times – I will NEVER apologize for the trifling/scandalous blacks folks who live amongst us, and I will NEVER apologize for the trifling/scandalous Muslims amongst us, and I will NEVER apologize for the trifling/scandalous womenfolk because the don’t represent or speak for me

  27. In my opinion, in some ways racism is more acceptable to blacks. It is ok to call to call the white a devil, or a this or a that without being called on it, but the white will be called on his racism. An example is the past popularity of Five Percenters in somewhat mainstream culture. 5%er’s are, by nature of their creed very racist, but Jay-Z and Busta Rymes both at one point aligned themselves with the group but we do not here any confrontation of their past as they both gain prominence in mainstream culture. I mention this because how many white politicians, and other than them, are confronted about statement that they made years ago? This being said, I don’t necassarily think blacks to be more racist than whites, just less restained in their expression of it. Since political correctness reconstructed language as politics racism amongst whites has been masked by terms such as ‘African American’ in place of other words that me as a white man are not supposed to say. A senario I have imagined to illustrate this in the american muslim world is this: I don’t know how times I have heard people saying they were once in the Nation for example, or I saw Message to the Blackman on their bookself or whatever and this is not problematic inspite of the implication is that they once ascribed themselves to a religion that considered me a blue-eyed devil who was created by a mad scientist named Yaqoob. I am not saying they should apologize to me or anything but what would the reaction of a muslim who is black be if I said that I was a member of the KKK when I was younger or had a copy of Mein Kemph or what whatever white supremist literature on my bookshelf? I tend to think there would a confrontation.

  28. Vanilla (Tw)ice – as a Muslim who happens to be black, frankly I wouldn’t care if you were in the KKK. As I used to say, I used to be a virgin, can’t change the past and never will be again so there’s no point in talking about it (unless your intentions are to learn from it).

    I have read Message to the Blackman, The Isis Papers, Miseducation of the Negro, Black Like Me (which all non Blacks should read), How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, as well as several other black power and afrocentric books. Yes, these books still line my bookshelf and my husand thinks I’m racist *SMH* Most of my time is spent on afrocentric message boards, I used to give dawah but grew tired of trying to explain how the majority of muslim behavior has NO basis in the Quran (or Sunnah). No, I was never in the NOI, but I am black and proud (but don’t have any hatred in my heart for others – something which most don’t understand. I get sick of hearing if you’re proud to be black, then you are racist LOL).

  29. I think that there are two main types of racism. One is the hatred of another race, this is the obvious kind.

    The other is not hating other races (in fact feelings towards them may be quite ambivalent), but thinking that your race is superior.

    This latter type is more insiduous and therefore more difficult to combat, it’s the sort that’s coupled with phases like “some of my best friends are…. (insert ethnic group of choice)” or the use of stereotypes, positive or negative.

  30. Abu Sinan,
    It is one thing to critique a dominant group, it is another thing to reinforce negative stereotypes of a disenfranchised group. My critiques don’t apply to everyone, but they are to point out chinks in the armor of white/Western/European cultural hegemony.

    “I understand a lot of what you say, however I see some difference between what you say and what I see.”
    Your observations about Black culture are based upon low income, underprivileged folks. Your experience with Black culture is limited. Among Middle Class Blacks, we don’t see those same problems. It all goes back to what I said, non-Blacks tend to talk about the Black community as if it is a monolith, it is as if we all live in ghettos and we are all poor. Have you checked the statistics?

    You are making a lot of broad generalizations based upon your limited oberservations. All you have stated about Black culture is what you know about pathologies due to poverty and social breakdown. You also mentioned negative rap music (based upon gangster culture), which does not apply to the various cultural productions of Black people (Gospel, R&B, Jazz, Blues) which has does not have the same misogynistic tendencies. Plus, there are a number of artists that do respect women. You just don’t know about them because of the way the music industry is set up. Importantly, you don’t seem to know much about the positives in Black culture. My understanding is not solely based upon personal experiences and observations, but also research and reading on my own cultural heritage. You have a lot less invested in studying that. It is easier to maintain your own pressupositions. And I find that problematic. They serve as blinders to blame an entire community for systematic oppression and discrimination.
    Let me clarify:
    I was talking about traditions of rearing children, which are dying out because of problems in I was talking about one’s respect for one’s mother.

    This is inconsistency of Tupac calling women ho’s and then turning around and writing a song about his momma being a “Black Queen” even though she was a crack fiend.

    Even though those ignorant young men call women bitches and ho’s, they are not calling their mommas out of their name. In fact, it can get you shot talking about someone’s mother.

    You don’t have Black kids beating up their mothers. It is rarely ever heard of, not matter how rough neck a brother is. But I have seen non-Black kids put in juvenile hall for laying hands on their mothers. It appalls many Black people. It is something that is not culturally acceptable to us. We show so much deference to the women in our families, which is so striking to the behavior in the hood.
    That deference does not mean that these mothers are able to teach young men how to be men. At the same time, my mother was a single mother and my brother is an upstanding father.

    These are cultural differences that you miss. I am talking about the strong bonds that Black people have towards their family, and the “matriarchical family.” Studies have shown how wealth is distributed in the black family, and how that differs from other communities. But then you deploy over generalizations, which border on the offensive. It goes back to something I stated earlier: non-Blacks seem to talk about Black culture from the lowest denominator. It is why I have a difficult time talking about race to most white men, you guys just don’t seem to get it. Time Wise gets it, Allen Johnston gets it, Dalton Conly gets it. Maybe you should take a class on Race and Social Stratification. Maybe after you read their erudite works, you can see how your “observations” reinforce notions of white supremacy.

    As for the generalizations and racist statements that Blacks say, I have tried to understand why these notions are perpetuated. The best way that I came to understand them was through Jame Scott’s concept of Hidden Transcripts. It is a way that the subordinated group challenges the hegemony of dominant groups. By bad mouthing, finding flaws, spreading gossip, rumors, generalizations, etc. these groups attempt to create their own space. Non-white folks say nasty things about white people as a defence against the constant barrage that they get about their inferiority. It is still reactive and defensive, and does little to combat white supremacy. Instead, as James Scott points out, it only allows for a pressure valve.

    Finally, from what my mentor has taught me about White privilege and White men’s defensive reactions to critiques of privilege, I think it is important that if you are truly about combatting racism, you have to be open to critique. You cannot set the terms of the debate about equality, instead you have to first come to understand those who have been rendered voiceless by the dominant group that you happen to be part of.

  31. Margari, I pretty much agreed with your entire assessment until you got to the point about why you think minorities say racist statements. Frankly, I think that’s a load of psychobabble bullsh*t which people like to use to load their own problems and feelings towards themselves into the laps of others. When a white person utters generalizations, stereotypes, and racist remarks about minorities we love to call him/her out on their racism. Yet when a minority utters generalizations, racist remarks, and stereotypes about the dominant group or other minorities we can suddenly view it as being defensive and a way to combat his own feelings of inferiority?! Please. I don’t buy that at all. I prefer to call it like I see it. Plain stupid and yes, racist.

    Using the hypothesis you just proposed I can go around calling white people disgusting pigs/wifebeaters/other disgusting garbage. And then when I am called on it I can say that I was just defending myself and releasing the pressure that builds up in me from my own feelings of inferiority caused by the white people and their constant barrage of criticism and supremacist views. I’m really not a racist and ignorant jerk. That’s just plain stupid

  32. Abu Sinan,
    I suggest you re-read my statement and not be fueled by emotion. I’m not trying to attack you, or your culture, but you don’t seem to read carefully:

    “Not all white families allow their children to be abusive. But there are cultural difference in the ways Black families raise their children. Discipline and respect is a huge part of Black culture. Part of it arises from slavery and being housekeepers in white families. Black children could not talk back or act out while the mother or grandmother was at work. Sometimes it was life or death, in other cases it was just a livelihood thing. (These cultural may be changing due to many young teenage mothers who do not know how to discipline their children)
    I was a nanny for a mixed Asian and White (well sort of the father was part Black Egyptian and adopted by a white couple) and I was shocked to see how the children would talk back or negotiate with their parents. They didn’t take no for an answer. Sometimes they’d say things like, “I hate you!” I look at Eminem, and he’s all pissed at his mother. That is crazy. That woman gave birth to him, I have zero respect for him because of that. What Black rapper makes a whole album dissing his mother? Why does that appeal to Middle Class white kids? We should be throwing eggs at him for making those songs. ”

    Did I generalize about the cultural ways White families raise their children? I said: “Not all white families allow their children to be abusive.” Then I stated cases that did shock me.

    Also, I think many of your statements can be broken down and analyzed point by point to refute some of the claims you made. Things are a lot more complex than your surface level analysis.

    Anon,

    “Frankly, I think that’s a load of psychobabble bullsh*t which people like to use to load their own problems and feelings towards themselves into the laps of others.”
    If you’re implying that I’m doing that, then you’re dead wrong. I’m trying to make an analysis to understand the difference between White supremacy in America and Black people’s racism (which grew up in the context of White supremacy in America). The difference is power, who holds it, who is creating the dominant culture, who is setting the terms of the discussion..
    This is not condoning Black racism, but just noting the difference. You don’t have to accept my analysis, it is an interpretation of resistance at its lowest order.

    I guess my biggest problem with talking about race and class in America, or the rest of the world, is that we often approach this issue based upon our own observations (subjectivity). We often lack the analytical and theoretical skills to get below the surface of what we are observing. There are many structural elements that me miss. Many don’t have the critical skills to understand culture and the ways various ethnic groups reproduce and reinforce cultural practices. Nor do we understand social inequality and how that is reproduced through cultural and social practices. We need to have a more critical understanding of how ethnicity, class, and gender intersect in our society. Otherwise, we are stuck going around in circles shouting at each other, or sweeping problems under the rug.

  33. Margari,

    You have made some major assumptions about myself which are untrue. The most blantant one is where you say my interaction with blacks is limited and it is mostly with low income blacks.

    This is indeed so far from the truth it isnt funny. I interact with African Americans on a DAILY basis in my personal and professional life. These same African Americans are almost entirely upper class, well educated, most of whom make salaries of $150,000 or more a year.

    But hey, dont let that get in the way of your opinions. You say I have to be open to critique, but I would offer you the same statement.

    See, this is what I have seen happen many times. You get the white guy who is willing to concede many points, yet it still attacked for not doing what the other sides refuses to do.

    I am nothing but honest in this situation. But I think I will leave it at that. It is best sometimes to know when to stop talking when you know it just isnt worth it.

    I have been down this road many times, where I am more than willing to concede points and give ground, only to be met with a stone wall on the other side backed with assumptions that turn out to be completely false. I guess the idea is if my ideas do not match with yours, it must be because “fill in standard excuse”.

    No thanks, my time of dealing with that was done years ago.

    Vanilla (Tw)Ice,

    I have to take acception to what you said. I know a lot of African Americans come to Islam via the Nation of Islam. I get the icy stares from those, usually men, who you can tell completely resent the idea that you are in a mosque. Yes, me, the blue eyed devil, has intruded upon what should be a santuary away from “the man”. Sometimes it takes some of these types longer to get over the “blue eyed devil” idea than others. I am not sure that some ever get over it.

    However, with my friends and people I have met I have often made it clear that I was indeed raised in a very racist environment and carried that racism with me in an active way for years.

    I have never had a negative comment or reaction because the people I choose to associate myself with see me for what I am, the way I carry myself, and the choices I have made in my life since I was a young guy.

    I have never had an issue with this fact, not from Arabs, not from African Americans, not from Desis. The response I get, if any, is usually “Subhan’Allah”. They are amazed that someone can be raised in such a manner and still be lead to a religion like Islam where race, technically speaking, is not supposed to matter.

    My father hated blacks, and resevered a special hatred for Arabs and Muslims, yet here I am, a Muslim convert for years married to an Arab with two precious little boys.

  34. I do not subscribe to the socio-economic argument myself. If you have a dysfunctional culture when people get money it will intensify their bad behavior and bring their demons out i.e. Saudi Arabia, Dubai, the NBA, Las Vegas, etc.

  35. “I guess my biggest problem with talking about race and class in America, or the rest of the world, is that we often approach this issue based upon our own observations (subjectivity). We often lack the analytical and theoretical skills to get below the surface of what we are observing. There are many structural elements that me miss. Many don’t have the critical skills to understand culture and the ways various ethnic groups reproduce and reinforce cultural practices. Nor do we understand social inequality and how that is reproduced through cultural and social practices. We need to have a more critical understanding of how ethnicity, class, and gender intersect in our society. Otherwise, we are stuck going around in circles shouting at each other, or sweeping problems under the rug.”/i>

    This is funny. Honey you don’t need a phD in whatever ethnic studies. Just go to a black or Hispanic neighborhood and ask the old folks, they will break it down to you, it is not that deep.

  36. To quantify my statement, Abu Sinan, I was speaking generally, of course I have met many people who do not fit in to what I described above. Perhaps there was a little venting in my previous post. And Bint Will, I was not in any way condemning what anybody has been throught that led them to Islam or otherwise. I simply wanted to address what I have grown to feel is a double standard amongst some, hopefully a minority, in the American Muslim community.

  37. Salaam alaikum Abu Sinan,
    You said: “You have made some major assumptions about myself which are untrue. The most blantant one is where you say my interaction with blacks is limited and it is mostly with low income blacks.”

    I did not make an assumption about who you know and what you know. I said:
    “You are making a lot of broad generalizations based upon your limited oberservations. All you have stated about Black culture is what you know about pathologies due to poverty and social breakdown. ”
    Limited observations does not mean that you don’t have a broad range of experiences. But the observations you made were limited.

    Your statements in this post about Black culture refer to the lowest common denominator. You used them to counter my argument about Black cultural practices of disciplining children (but there was a disconnect in our argument because I was talking about respect for parents and methods of discipline that were rooted in former slave culture). You used examples of rap music, school drop outs, and disrespect to women to argue that Black culture does instill in children respect and discipline. So far, when I see you making an argument about Black culture, it does reflect your limited understanding of our cultural traditions, whether you interacted with Black people extensively or not. You have a right to your opinion, but please do not insert things that were not stated. It does not lead to a true discourse. We can’t reach a place of understanding if the topic is not understood.

    “This is funny. Honey you don’t need a phD in whatever ethnic studies. Just go to a black or Hispanic neighborhood and ask the old folks, they will break it down to you, it is not that deep.”
    I appreciate the opinions of organic intellectuals in the Black community. Our elders have so much wisdom, but at the same time you can’t dismiss Black intellectuals such as W.E.B. DuBois, Cornell West, Frantz Fanon, bell Hooks and their powerful commentaries on race social inequality in America. No, you don’t need a Ph.D. to understand concepts. You can get analytical tools by observing, reading, and having productive discourse with other intellectuals (street or academic). Their is rampant anti-intellectualism in Black and Muslim communities, but this does not help us understand our conditions and move forward.

  38. The post and the comments bring up good points. I got to the second half of the comments and then had to just scroll down before my eyes got too sore from all the reading.
    Maybe it has varying degrees to do with both race and class. Race indicates location of origin. Location indicates possible tribes of origin. Tribe indicates language/culture. In a racist world, origin is made to indicate class as well. Class also affects culture. Origin (race for instance) indicates privilege or oppression. This affects culture. Problems end up being cultural and class-based even when race is made less important.
    Abu Sinan you’re right for not being ashamed of your heritage because YOU didn’t oppress anyone. But white heritage is little to be proud of and much to be ashamed of, and I say this with no hate in my heart. African heritages are one step at best above because we love others, but we still oppress ourselves alot. Ask Black women who used to get used by white men and now get dissed by Black men in music. We all said every culture has its good and bad. But, I’m saying that European cultures are distinct. One on hand Europe is well-organized. But on the other hand, at whose expense? It’s easy to be top dog when when you’re eating other dogs’ meals. One thing has put an end to white on white violence and that’s been uniting to dominate others.
    No matter the history, though, all of you who took shahada are my siblings and I love you because of Allah. Whatever some dead ancestors did, I ain’t holding against the living. If we got problems with each other it’s not because of race. Culture maybe, just ask the Desis I know, I got major issues with their culture and I hate ghetto culture, too. They’re inferior and they’re the biggest obstacles to moral reform I’ve ever known. They get hooks in you and hold you back even when you’re Muslim. That’s why I say ghetto culture, MTV and BET culture, and this whole imported booble-head sunnah have got to go. This whole Arab culture can keep the hospitality and throw out the rest. In the masajid, you see those Arabs who wanna lead and teach the deen because they’re Arabs.
    And Umar’s right, we need a cultural revolution among ourselves. How we gonna deny that? Our religion is superior and others are inferior and we got quit apologizing for it. But our cultures are inferior, everyone’s included, to Islam and we owe apologies and taubah for THAT. We know right from wrong, we just don’t want to do right all the time, because in the non-racial meaning of the word, we Muslims are all niggers more than the non-Muslims because we should know better.
    One of you said the poor are ready to fight each other over the scraps from the rich man’s table, and that’s so true. That’s just one reason I say one thing different from what Umar said about jihadists, though. We need a cultural revolution AND we need some ‘jihadists’, too. Because our enemies are ourselves AND the shaytan out there. The Shaytan have a program and it’s simple and effective. If the Shaytan in you is successful and in subduing you, the outside Shaytan (FBI or whoever else) don’t have to do much beat sit back and monitor. If it’s subdued, then the Shaytan from outside will step in with reinforcements like misinformation, new ideas, you name it. The government never stopped deceiving Black civil rights leaders until they were distrustful of each other and the communities were drug-ridden. If the Black community had made drugs a failure, they’d have just kept trying with other tactics and drugs until we started rebelling against their authority. So Muslims need an internal overhaul, and we still need outside resistance against whoever is gonna try to interfere if we get any revivals going. Or else they’ll just put us right back to fighting each other over their scraps.
    And that’s what’s up, y’all!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s